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Papers @ Bled eConference 2020

Bled truly eConference 2020.

The physical Bled eConference in Slovenia have, along with most other conferences, been cancelled due to the Covid-19 pandemic. However, today is the first time in 33 years that the conference has moved online, and made it possible for me to attend. Glad to be part of this! Nice setup of the short online conference, with thumbs up for the keynote and nice to hear the thoughts of the track chairs on the research.

I had two papers at the conference, both published in the conference proceedings. The first paper is a paper on the use of Twitter for innovation tighter with Helen Cripps, Abhay Singh and Jari Salo – Crowdsourcing through Twitter for innovation. The second paper is written in cooperation with Tonje Lindmark, Ulrik Söderström and Helen Cripps and is all about how the filter bubble is effected by UX – The user experience of personalized content. Both papers are available open access in the conference proceedings. Please have a look!

Open access

Download and read the papers

The user experience of personalized content

Abstract Content in digital services is often filtered for users based on individual preferences with the possible consequence of creating a state referred to as a “filter bubble”. The objective of this paper is to examine which of a user’s inherent needs that are important to satisfy when a user is consuming personalized content in a digital service. The paper uses a survey to measure the need for autonomy, competence and relatedness of the Self-Determination Theory when users are consuming filtered content in digital services. The results show that the investigated services fail to satisfy all needs. A satisfactory user experience should include the opportunity for the user to satisfy the need for autonomy, competence and relatedness. For autonomy, transparency of filtering and choice about filtering should be offered. For competence, it is essential to offer content that the user can learn from, and also provide the right amount of choice throughout the service. The danger of filter bubbles is not personalization, but to remove choice about personalization.

Cite as:

Mejtoft, T., Lindmark, T., Söderström, U., & Cripps, H. (2020). The user experience of personalized content. In A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, R. Bons, H. Cripps, A. Sheombar & D. Vidmar (Eds.), 33rd Bled eConference: Enabling Technology for a Sustainable Society: Conference Proceedings (pp. 147-158). Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor University Press.
(isbn: 978-961-286-362-3; doi: 10.18690/978-961-286-362-3.10)

Crowdsourcing through Twitter for innovation

Abstract This research investigates the role and use of Twitter in business markets and benefits of using open social media channels to crowd source information to support innovation and build relationship in the context of business-to-business (B2B) marketing. This study is based on a combination of methodologies, 52 face-to-face interviews across five countries are compared with a sample of their Tweets using Structural Topic Modelling (STM) which enabled triangulation between stated use of Twitter and respondent’s actual Tweets. The research confirmed that individuals used Twitter as a source of information, ideas and innovation within their industry. Twitter enables the building of relevant business relationships through the exchange of new, expert and high quality information within like-minded communities in real time, between companies and their suppliers, customers and also their peers. This research highlights the business relationship building capacity of Twitter as it enables customer and peer conversations that eventually support the development of product and service innovations.

Cite as:

Cripps, H., Singh, A. K., Mejtoft, T. & Salo, J. (2020). Crowdsourcing through Twitter for innovation. In A. Pucihar, M. Kljajić Borštnar, R. Bons, H. Cripps, A. Sheombar & D. Vidmar (Eds.), 33rd Bled eConference: Enabling Technology for a Sustainable Society: Conference Proceedings (pp. 185-200). Maribor, Slovenia: University of Maribor University Press.
(isbn: 978-961-286-362-3; doi: 10.18690/978-961-286-362-3.13)

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